Best Tires for Tacoma – 2022 Round-up

The Toyota Tacoma debuted in 1995 as a replacement for the compact SR5 pickup. Offered in 2WD, 4WD, and several models, including a standard, crew cab, and an off-road-oriented TRD, it has been one of the best-selling medium trucks in North America, with over 2,000,000 million being sold to date.

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Tacoma Tire Size Overview

Let’s review the tire sizes.

  • OEM Tire Size(s):
    • 195/75/14, 225/75/15, 265/75/15, 31×10.5R15

  • Trim(s): Regular Cab, Extra Cab, Double Cab
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  • OEM Tire Size(s):
    • 215/70/15, 245/75/16, 265/70/16, 245/45/18, 265/65/17, 265/60/18

  • Trim(s): Regular Cab, Access Cab, Double Cab, Prerunner, X-Runner
Photo credit: reddit.com
  • OEM Tire Size(s):
    • 245/75/16, 265/70/16, 265/65/17, 265/60/18

  • Trim(s): Access Cab, Double Cab, Prerunner, Limited, SR, SR5, TRD
Photo credit: tacomabeast.com

Choosing New Tacoma Tires

We know that finding the right tire for your Tacoma can be difficult, not to mention having several types to choose from. Keeping that in mind, we will keep it simple and focus on tires that cover the needs and uses of most Tacoma owners.

What’s Your Weather Like?

You should always consider the weather conditions where you live when purchasing a set of tires. In simple terms, tires are designed for specific applications, whether it be better wet and snow traction or off-road performance. As such, there are trade-offs to each, and we will help you find the best tire for the driving conditions in your area.

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What Do You Use Your Toyota Tacoma For?

Like weather conditions, how (and where) you drive your Tacoma will influence your tire buying decisions. For example, aggressive off-road tires may provide extra traction in the mud and snow, but they are noisier and less fuel-efficient on the highway. On the other hand, highway or street tires may be quieter, but they generally have less traction in the mud and snow.

Comfort, Performance, Budget. Pick Two.

Keeping in mind the Tacoma is a medium-sized pickup, a set of four tires can cost well over $1,000 when adding in installation costs. As such, tire choices will vary depending on an owner’s needs, driving habits, and budget. Therefore, we have compiled a list of tires that represent a balance of decent tread life, on and off-road performance, and price.

Comparison of the Best Tires for Tacoma

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The Best Tires for Tacoma

As previously mentioned, tires are classified by application such as highway, touring, off-road, and all-season. Therefore, we have chosen the best in five categories that cover the uses for most Toyota Tacoma owners: Best Overall, Best All-Terrain, Best Budget, Best Off-Road, and Best Snow.

Best Overall

General Grabber A/TX

Ratings (out of 5)

4.5

Dry Performance: 4.6

Wet Performance: 4.5

Overall Comfort: 4.3

Treadwear: 4.5

Offroad Performance: 4.6

Snow/Ice Performance: 4.5

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Since its introduction, the General Grabber A/TX has long been a best-seller and remains a popular choice for many SUVs and truck owners. Unsurprisingly, it sits at the top of our list as well. In fact, the Grabber A/TX is about as close to a perfect tire as you can get. While it may not be a class leader in any particular category, it is not far behind them, and there are no glaring weaknesses. Simply put, this is truly a solid all-around performer. 

In terms of key metrics like dry and wet-weather performance, they are better than average. Not to mention, it receives good scores for off-road and snow performance. Likewise, (and despite being considered an on/off-road all-terrain (A/T) tire), it is surprisingly quiet on the highway. All said and done, the General Grabber A/TX was designed from the ground up for trucks and work vehicles and is backed up by a good 60,000-mile tread warranty.

Other Specifications

UTQG Rating: 640 A B

Directional: No

TireRack Road Hazard Protection: Yes

Treadlife Warranty: 6 year/60,000 miles

Price Range: $191.43 to $202.99

Best All-Terrain Tire

Cooper Discoverer AT3 4S

Ratings (out of 5)

4.5

Dry Performance: 4.6

Wet Performance: 4.6

Overall Comfort: 4.5

Treadwear: 4.4

Offroad Performance: 4.5

Snow/Ice Performance: 4.3

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The Cooper Discoverer AT3 4S is another solid all-around performer, and it gives our top choice, the General Grabber A/TX, a run for its money. Likewise, Cooper managed to strike the right balance between off-road capability on-road civility. In other words, it can handle some dirt and mud without the poor ride and excess road noise that is commonly associated with proper A/T tires. 

The AT3 4S is more than enough for most Tacoma owners, and few will need anything with a more aggressive tread. Not to mention, this is one of the most durable and puncture-resistant tires on our list. The only complaints we have with the Cooper are the average snow and ice traction scores which could be better for an A/T tire.

Other Specifications

UTQG Rating: 620 A B

Directional: No

TireRack Road Hazard Protection: Yes

Treadlife Warranty: 6 years/65,000 miles

Price Range: $179.99 to $250.99

Best Budget Tire

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport LT

Ratings (out of 5)

4.4

Dry Performance: 4.6

Wet Performance: 4.5

Overall Comfort: 4.3

Treadwear: 4.4

Snow/Ice Performance: 4.4

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Despite being a budget tire, the BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport LT is a decent performer with a better-than-average tread life and dry and wet traction. In addition, (and considering it was designed for SUVs), it has the smoothest and quietest ride of all the tires on our list.

On the downside, a car-like ride comes with some disadvantages. Most notably, off-road performance is expectedly below average. Furthermore, the Advantage T/A Sport LT is not the most durable tire out there, and driving in said conditions will drastically reduce the tread life. Secondly, snow traction could be better, but this is not surprising since the Advantage T/A Sport LT was designed for street-driven SUVs.

All in all, this is an excellent budget tire if you prefer a smooth, quiet ride and rarely venture off paved surfaces.

Other Specifications

UTQG Rating: 740 B A

Directional: No

TireRack Road Hazard Protection: Yes

Treadlife Warranty: 6 years/65,000 miles

Price Range: $146.82 to $193.99

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Best Off-Road Tire

Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus

Ratings (out of 5)

4.5

Dry Performance: 4.6

Wet Performance: 4.6

Overall Comfort: 4.4

Treadwear: 4.5

Offroad Performance: 4.5

Snow/Ice Performance: 4.4

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Pirelli has a reputation for making excellent tires, and the Scorpion All-Terrain Plus is no exception. With that said, the Scorpion A/T Plus has long been popular with drivers needing a tire that can hold up to some off-road use. While it may not be suitable for mud bogging (there are better options), the Scorpion has surprisingly good highway manners. Despite not being as quiet as others on our list, it is significantly quieter than some of the more aggressive all-terrain and mud-terrain tires out there. 

With that said, the Scorpion All Terrain Plus gets high marks for dry, wet, and off-road performance. If you frequently venture off-road or regularly drive on dirt roads, this is an excellent choice.

Other Specifications

UTQG Rating: 640 A B

Directional: No

TireRack Road Hazard Protection: Yes

Treadlife Warranty: Unlimited/50,000 miles

Price Range: $185.30 to $223.10

Best Snow Tire

Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V2

Ratings (out of 5)

4.5

Dry Performance: 4.4

Wet Performance: 4.6

Overall Comfort: 4.4

Treadwear: 4.2

Snow/Ice Performance: 4.7

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Granted, few Tacoma owners will need snow tires, but if you do, the Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V2 is the benchmark by which others are measured. It has long been the class leader for winter tires, and it is not difficult to see why. While we recommend staying at home in wintry conditions, if you must venture out, the best way to do it is on a set of Blizzaks. 

Simply put, no tire can deliver consistent (in relative terms) traction in the snow, slush, and ice. For this reason, many drivers who live in the northern states install Blizzaks on their vehicles in the winter months.

It should be noted that the Blizzaks, like all snow tires, are intended to be used during the winter months only. Likewise, unless you live in an area with frequent heavy snowfall, a set of decent on/off-road all-terrain tires is usually sufficient for most drivers.

Other Specifications

UTQG Rating: N/A

Directional: Yes

TireRack Road Hazard Protection: Yes

Treadlife Warranty: None

Price Range: $181.05 to $207.99

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Conclusion

While the tires listed above are excellent choices in their respective categories, you should choose one that best suits your needs and driving habits. Therefore, it is important to consider the weather conditions where you live, your driving habits, and where you drive before purchasing a set of tires for your Tacoma.

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People Also Ask

Below are some frequently asked questions about Tacoma.

Can You Fit 33 Inch Tires on a Stock Tacoma?

Not without modifications. Fitting 33-inch tires on a Tacoma will require some cutting of the fenders, the cab mount, and some suspension modifications depending on the model and year. Alternatively, many owners choose to install a lift kit, although they can be pricey.

How Often Should I Rotate My Tacoma’s Tires?

Generally speaking, you should rotate your tires every 5,000 to 7,500 miles unless otherwise specified in your owner’s manual. If your Tacoma is equipped with 4WD, the tires should be rotated more frequently, usually every 5,000 miles.