BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport vs Michelin Premier A/S: A 2021 Analysis

| Last Updated: August 12, 2021

One of the most competitive segments of the tire market is the Grand Touring All-Season. In that sense, the contenders we will review today are two heavyweights. On the one hand, the affordable BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport and on the other hand the prestigious Michelin Premier A/S.

Both tires are aimed at the same audience, mid-size sedans, coupes, and minivans. Likewise, both BFG and Michelin seek to provide outstanding road safety and performance with their respective tread design regardless of the season of the year or driving style. 

Who will be the winner? We invite you to find out below.

Photo credit: tractionnews.com

TL;DR: BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport vs Michelin Premier A/S

Before we begin our analysis, it is appropriate to look at each tire’s pros and cons.

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport All-Season Radial Tire-205/55R16 91H

PROS

  • Excellent value
  • Better treadwear ratings
  • Slightly better overall performance in all key areas

CONS

  • Slightly lower wet performance than the Premier A/S
  • Ratings are still not as reliable as those of Michelin Premier A/S

Best For:

Owners of sedans, coupes, minivans, and crossover vehicles looking for an affordable tire with excellent durability and predictable all-season performance.

Michelin Premier A/S

Michelin Premier A/S All- Season Radial Tire-225/45R18 91V

PROS

  • Better overall ride quality
  • Slightly better “wet performance”
  • They offer a Special Manufacturer's Warranty

CONS

  • More expensive than the Advantage T/A Sport
  • Not as good Treadwear ratings as its BFGoodrich counterpart

Best For:

Owners of sedans, coupes, minivans, and crossover vehicles looking for a premium tire with excellent durability and predictable all-season performance.

Performance Ratings: Advantage T/A Sport vs Premier A/S

An important point to consider when comparing two tires is the reliability of their performance ratings. In simple terms, the higher the number of miles reported, the greater the reliability of the scores exhibited by the different ratings.

That said, we have the BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport tire with just over 1.2 million reported miles and 103 verified reviews. Within the Grand Touring All-Season category, this tire is ranked 16 out of 57.

On the other hand, we have the Michelin Premier A/S with more than 10 million miles reported and 580 verified reviews. While the Premier A/S ranks 16 out of 57 in the Grand Touring All-Season segment, we should note that its ratings are much more reliable than those of the Advantage T/A Sport.

Photo credit: michelinman,com

We will now begin a comparison of the two tires under different conditions. If you want to jump directly to one of the categories, click on the corresponding link below.

Dry Performance: Advantage T/A Sport vs Premier A/S

Dry Performance Ratings

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport

Michelin Premier A/S

Dry Overall

9.2

9.0

Cornering Stability

9.0

9.0

Dry Traction

9.3

9.2

Steering Response

9.1

8.9

For an all-season tire, dry performance is critical. In that sense, the results shown in the table above are quite interesting.

At first glance, the BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport enjoys a slight advantage over its Michelin counterpart. However, as discussed in the previous section, it should be noted that the Advantage T/A Sport's ratings are not as reliable as those of the Michelin Premier A/S tire.

This motivates us to assure that both of these tires provide an identical level of dry performance in daily driving applications.

Wet Performance: Advantage T/A Sport vs Premier A/S

Wet Performance Ratings

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport

Michelin Premier A/S

Wet Overall

8.9

9.1

Hydroplaning Resistance

8.9

9.0

Wet Traction

8.9

9.1

Michelin has made quite clear that they have placed a huge emphasis on the wet performance of the Premier A/S. Proof of this is its extreme silica, and sunflower oil enhanced tread compound and its tread pattern that uses EverGrip and Emerging Grooves technologies.

This effort is evident in the wet performance results. In this case, the argument used above is equally valid. Although the wet performance advantage of the Michelin Premier A/S over the BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport is minimal, you can be sure that those values are absolutely reliable.

In summary, if the current trend continues, we could say that both options offer very similar hydroplaning resistance and wet traction.

Snow / Ice Performance: Advantage T/A Sport vs Premier A/S

Snow / Ice Performance Ratings

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport

Michelin Premier A/S

Snow / Ice Overall

7.8

7.5

Light Snow Traction

8.6

8.3

Deep Snow Traction

7.6

7.3

Ice Traction

7.1

7.0

One of the aspects that all-season tire buyers pay the most attention to is snow and ice performance. This makes a lot of sense since these tires are supposed to have an adequate level of traction all year long.

In the comparison chart, we can see how once again, the BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport shows a slight advantage over the Michelin Premier A/S, even though Michelin uses special compounds for better traction in cold weather.

Given BFGoodrich's successful track record in designing treads for extreme conditions, we think this slight advantage over the Michelin Premier A/S is likely to hold up over time. So if your primary concern is snow or ice performance, the Advantage T/A Sport may be a better choice.

Comfort Performance: Advantage T/A Sport vs Premier A/S

Comfort Performance Ratings

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport

Michelin Premier A/S

Overall Comfort

8.4

8.7

Ride Quality

8.7

8.9

Noise

8.0

8.5

When it comes to overall comfort, ride quality, and noise levels, the roles are reversed. Michelin is widely known as a premium brand that devotes enormous resources to delivering the best possible driving experience.

Such dedication is evident in the results shown in the table. The Michelin Premier A/S outperforms its competitor in all areas, although admittedly by a rather slim margin.

If you are looking for all-season tires that offer the lowest possible noise level and the best possible ride quality, the Michelin Premier A/S is definitely for you.

Treadwear Performance: Advantage T/A Sport vs Premier A/S

Treadwear Ratings

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport

Michelin Premier A/S

Treadwear

8.7

6.9

Thus, we arrive in the last category, which has a lot to do with the tire’s durability and the value it offers.

The results speak for themselves. In this case, the remarkable difference between the tread durability of the BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport and the Michelin Premier A/S cannot be excused with the argument of reported mileage and the reliability of the results. 

In terms of both durability and cost-benefit ratio, the undisputed winner is the BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport. If you need an economical tire with the potential for a long lifespan, this is the right choice.

Warranty: Advantage T/A Sport vs Premier A/S

Warranty Type

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport

Michelin Premier A/S

Treadlife Warranty

6-year warranty or 60,000 miles (whichever occurs first). This warranty is halved for rear tires when they are different in size from the front tires.

6-year warranty or 60,000 miles (whichever occurs first). This warranty is halved for rear tires when they are different in size from the front tires.

Uniformity Warranty

One year of use or the first 2/32" of wear.

One year of use or the first 2/32" of wear.

Workmanship / Materials Warranty

6-year warranty and free tire replacement for the first year, 2/32" wear, or 25% wear.

6-year warranty and free tire replacement for the first year, 2/32" wear, or 25% wear.

Road Hazard Warranty

Unfortunately, BFGoodrich does not offer a road hazard warranty on this tire.

Sadly, Michelin does not offer a road hazard warranty on this tire.

Tire Rack Road Hazard Warranty

Refunds of up to $40 for repairs per tire per occurrence. Refund of the original purchase price or replacement purchase price (whichever is less) when the tire suffers non-repairable damage (valid within the first 2 years of use).

Refunds of up to $40 for repairs per tire per occurrence. Refund of the original purchase price or replacement purchase price (whichever is less) when the tire suffers non-repairable damage (valid within the first 2 years of use).

Although on paper both warranties look identical, it should be noted that Michelin offers a Special Manufacturer's Warranty that includes a 60-day satisfaction guarantee and 3-year flat changing service. This represents a clear advantage of the Michelin Premier A/S to keep in mind during your decision process.

Specs & Options: Advantage T/A Sport vs Premier A/S

Given that both of these tires belong to the Grand Touring All-Season segment, it is not surprising that their market coverage is so similar.

The BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport is available in sizes ranging from 15-inch to 19-inch wheels and tire widths ranging from 185 to 265. 

The Michelin Premier A/S, on the other hand, come in the same 15-inch to 19-inch sizes but in widths ranging from 195 to 245. 

In terms of UTQG rating, the Advantage T/A Sport has a 600 A A rating while the Premier A/S has a 640 A A rating. For more information about the meaning of the UTQG rating, click here. 

Photo credit: autoblog.com

Reviews: Advantage T/A Sport vs Premier A/S

The information provided by reviews from drivers who have used both of these tires is invaluable.

Starting with the BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport, it is evident that drivers who have used this tire simply love it. Whether the driving style is spirited or average, 90% of users speak highly of the tire's performance in the dry, wet, and even snow. As for its durability is not uncommon to find reviews from drivers with over 60,000 miles on this tire.

If we review the comments from Michelin Premier A/S users, the situation is very similar. This tire offers excellent all-weather performance, predictable cornering handling, amazing braking response, and good resistance to hydroplaning.

It is worth noting, though, that there are a huge number of drivers who have used the Michelin Premier A/S for over 80k miles with no problems, as well as a considerable number of people who at 45k miles require a new set of tires. Upon closer inspection, we realize that this disparity may have something to do with proper tire rotation.

After analyzing the hundreds of reviews from drivers who have used these tires, we can conclude that you really can't go wrong choosing any of them. Both these options will give you similar performance. 

That said, if you are more inclined towards comfort and low noise levels, the Michelin Premier A/S is certainly a better choice. At the same time, the BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport seems more suitable for people looking for the best cost-benefit ratio.

Photo credit: whatsupwoodbridge.com

Quick Recap

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport All-Season Radial Tire-205/55R16 91H

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport

Dry

9.2

Wet

8.9

Snow / Ice

7.8

Comfort

8.4

Treadwear

8.7


Michelin Premier A/S All- Season Radial Tire-225/45R18 91V

Michelin Premier A/S

Dry

9.0

Wet

9.1

Snow / Ice

7.5

Comfort

8.7

Treadwear

6.9

End of the Road

If anything has become clear throughout this review, it’s that the two tires we are comparing provide very similar performance. 

Perhaps, the only area where BFGoodrich has a palpable advantage over Michelin is that the Advantage T/A Sport is priced approximately 15-20% below the Premier A/S. 

Our opinion? Neither of these tires will disappoint. Both will give you outstanding summer and winter performance as well as the phenomenal durability you've come to expect from brands of this level.

Damaso has been in the automotive world since he was 14 years old and his father decided to bought an auto repair shop. Years later, his passion for electronics, computers, and automotive mechanics motivated him to graduate in Mechanical Engineering and venture into the sales of automotive equipment. For years Damaso worked as a technical advisor assisting car dealerships, tire shops, and even the plants of Toyota and Mitsubishi that operate in his country. He has over 25 years of experience reporting on topics ranging from DIY jobs, technological analysis, automotive news, and more. He is a wealth of information and a valued member of our team.